Where to go for help with dating violence

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, designed to raise awareness about this and related issues. One study found that, in junior high and high school, teens who drank alcohol before age 13 were more likely to be both victims and abusers when it comes to physical dating violence.Another study found that teenage girls in abusive relationships are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, have eating disorders, engage in unsafe sexual behaviors, and attempt suicide.Many groups and people want to help you live a healthier, happier life.Did you know that alcohol and drugs play a major role in increasing violence toward a partner in a relationship?However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.Teen dating violence [PDF 187KB] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. Teen dating violence (physical and sexual) among US high school students: Findings from the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. As teens develop emotionally, they are heavily influenced by experiences in their relationships.

National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline: 1-866-331-9474National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) | 1-800-787-3224 [TTY]National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)Love is Respect is a joint project between the National Dating Abuse Helpline and Break the Cycle to provide resources for teens, parents, friends and family, peer advocates, government officials, law enforcement officials and the general public. Breakthe engages, educates, and empowers youth to build lives and communities free from domestic and dating violence.

NCVC is the nation's leading resource and advocacy organization for crime victims and those who serve them.

Since its inception in 1985, NCVC has worked with grassroots organizations and criminal justice agencies throughout the United States serving millions of crime victims.

Victims of teen dating violence often keep the abuse a secret.

They should be encouraged to reach out to trusted adults like parents, teachers, school counselors, youth advisors, or health care providers.

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