Baby boomers return to dating

That makes them a prime target market for dating sites, and with good reason.

One in three single baby boomers has never even been married, according to a 2012 survey by Bowling Green State University’s National Center for Family and Marriage Research in Ohio.

Pew found that 15% of us have used dating sites and phone apps.

But the numbers are much bigger for the young - 27% of young adults, ages 18 to 24, report they have used such tools. But here’s the show stopper: “The share of 55- to 64-year-olds who use online dating has doubled over the same time period (from 6% in 2013 to 12% in 2015).” Do the math.

The so-called gray divorce rate has risen sharply — from just one in 10 people over the age of 50 in 1990, to around one in four in 2009 — according to research by sociologists Susan Brown and I-Fen Lin of Bowling Green State University.

Supply and demand works particularly well for boomers, says Paul Oyer, 52, professor of economics at the Stanford School of Business and author of “Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned from Online Dating.” (He met his partner four years ago on JDate.) “Economics is the study of scare resources and online dating is even more valuable as you get older,” he says. And you’re not going to meet people offline in the same numbers.” And more older people feel comfortable trying online dating.

More baby boomers are clicking their way to true love.

The share of 55- to 64-year-olds that sign up for dating sites has doubled from 6% in 2013 to 12% in 2015, according to a survey released Thursday of 2,000 adults by the Pew Research Center, a think tank in Washington, D. Meanwhile, the share of 18- to 24-year-olds that report having used online dating to meet people has nearly tripled in the last two years to 27% from 10%.

Perhaps over your teen and young-adult years your parent(s) initiated many talks about love, dating, sex and the selection of a life partner. She also gets to know more about him to decide just how interested she is. To your parents’ distress, the ability to get an erection was probably never an issue for the pimply-faced teenager you dated.

Apps like Tinder are popular among young people, researchers say, but there are more complex reasons why older singletons have gone online.

Boomers are more likely to be single, divorced or widowed, studies have shown.

"In 20 we saw 81 percent and 314 percent growth in registration among the 55-64 group," Coffee Meets Bagel cofounder Dawoon Kang told NBC.

"The growth was particularly strong among women." "This is a vibrant, growing community of singles that's taking the dating scene by storm, and rightfully so," said Dr.

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